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Tacos Barbacoa De Chivo

Country: Mexico

Story: In contemporary Mexico, Tacos Barbacoa generally refers to meats, whole sheep or whole goats slow-cooked over an open fire, or more traditionally, in a hole dug in the ground covered with maguey leaves, although the interpretation is loose, and in the present day, they may refer to meat steamed until tender. This meat is known for its high fat content and strong flavor, often accompanied with onions and cilantro. In Northern Mexico, it is also sometimes made from beef head, but more often it is prepared from goat meat (cabrito). In Central Mexico, the meat of choice is lamb, and in the Yucatan, their traditional version, cochinita pibil (pit-style pork), is prepared with pork.

Our version here at Alma is marinated in an Adobo made from Guajio and Chipotle chiles and then slow roasted in the oven.

Preparation: Local goat is marinated in the Adobo sauce over night and then slow roasted in the oven until very tender. When this is done, some of the mixture is placed on fresh tortillas and garnished with radish, avocado puree, green onion and cilantro.

Tacos Baja

Country: Mexico

Story: Tacos de pescado (“fish tacos”) originated in Baja California in Mexico, where they consist of grilled or fried fish, lettuce or cabbage, pico de gallo, and a sour cream or citrus/mayonnaise sauce, all placed on top of a corn or flour tortilla. They are often found at street vendors, and they have many regional variations. Our variation includes tempura batter to make our fried fish, shrimp or cauliflower very crispy on the outside. Tempura batter is actually a Japanese recipe that results in one of the lightest crispy batters you can use.

Preparation: Fish, shrimp or cauliflower is dipped into tempura batter and then fried until very crispy. This is placed on a flour tortilla and then topped with fresh cabbage and chipotle aioli.

Tacos Arrachera Encebollada

Country: Mexico

Story: The “Arrachera” is the name given in Mexico to a particular cut of beef which is packed with flavor but needs to be cooked delicately to make tender. It can also be called entraña in Guatemala and Argentina, entrécula in Spain, skirt steak in the United States and onglet in France. In its raw form it is a very fibrous and innervated meat, so you must make it tender by the way you cut it after it is cooked or by using a marinate for the meat, which consists of seasoning the meat with certain spices and ingredients such as vinegar. This will make it softer while giving it a better flavor.

Encebollado in its simplest definition means a technique of cooking with onions. It can also be the name of a number of dishes. Maybe the most popular example of this would be Encebollado as the name of a fish stew in Ecuador where it is the national dish. For us here at Alma this means that our Arrachera cut of meat and onions are cooked together to order for our tacos.

Preparation: Thin slices of Arrachera and onions are cooked on the plancha until tender and then mixed with salsa verde. The mixture is then placed on a corn tortillas and topped off with queso Bagaces.


Pozole Rojo

Country: Mexico

Story: Pozole, which means “hominy”, is a traditional stew from Mexico. It is made from hominy, meat (typically pork), and can be seasoned and garnished with shredded lettuce, chile peppers, onion, garlic, radishes, avocado, salsa or limes. Pozole is typically served on New Year’s Eve to celebrate the new year.

Since maize was a sacred plant for the Aztecs and other inhabitants of Mesoamerica, pozole was made to be consumed on special occasions. The conjunction of maize (usually whole hominy kernels) and meat in a single dish is of particular interest to scholars, because the ancient Americans believed the gods made humans out of masa. According to research by the Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia and the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, on these special occasions, the meat used in the pozole was human. After the prisoners were killed by having their hearts torn out in a ritual sacrifice, the rest of the body was chopped and cooked with maize, and the resulting meal was shared among the whole community as an act of religious communion. After the Conquest, when cannibalism was banned (including here at Alma de Amon), pork became the staple meat as it “tasted very similar” to human flesh.

The three main types of pozole are white, green and red. Here at Alma we serve red pozole made from one or more chiles, such as guajillo, piquin, or ancho. When pozole is served, it is accompanied by a wide variety of condiments, potentially including chopped onion, shredded lettuce, sliced radish, cabbage, avocado, limes, oregano, tostadas, chicharrón, or chiles.

Preparation: All of the ingredients are placed in a pot and stewed on low heat for a long amount of time. This lets the meat become very tender and allows for the deep flavors to develop. When ready it is garnished with radish, cilantro, lime and white onion.


Guacamole Con Pina

Country: Mexico

Story: Avocados were first cultivated in South Central Mexico about 10,000 years ago. In the early 1900s, avocados frequently went by the name alligator pear. Guacamole has increased avocado sales in nearly all countries in the Americas. Guacamole dip is traditionally made by mashing ripe avocados and sea salt with a molcajete y tejolote. Recipes call for tomato, garlic, lemon or lime juice, chili or cayenne pepper, cilantro, basil, jalapeño and additional seasonings. Some non-traditional recipes call for sour cream or even peas and nuts. In our version at Alma we add grilled pineapple and crumbled Bagaces cheese.

Preparation: Avocado, red onion, lime, cilantro and salt are mixed together until the avocado is creamy. This is garnished with grilled pineapple, queso Bagaces, red onion and cilantro. Homemade corn chips are served on the side.

Chicharron de Falda

Country: Costa Rica

Story: Chicharrones are made by frying pork in fat, and are associated with several dishes. Most Ticos usually eat them with rangpur or lime juice and fried yuca, accompanied by tortillas. It is also a main ingredient in a popular dish called chifrijo, which also combines red beans, rice, and pico de gallo. Another popular dish in Costa Rican cuisine that includes chicharrones is the vigorón.

For our version, we marinate the pork belly in roasted garlic puree, bomba spice and chile de arbol. Pork belly is great because it has a high fat content which helps to make it tender. This is marinated overnight and then cooked sous vide until it is very, very tender. Also a mojo is made in a traditional way and then cas fruit is added to give it an ingredient that is local to Costa Rica.


Sous vide (pronounced sue-veed) is a cooking technique that utilizes precise temperature control to deliver consistent results. High-end restaurants have been using sous vide cooking for years to cook food to the exact level of doneness desired, every time. The technique is popular because of easy-to-use sous vide precision cooking equipment called a circulator. The circulator heats water to a specific temperature that you choose which is determined by what you are cooking. Sous vide, which means “under vacuum” in French, refers to the process of sealing food in a bag, then cooking it to a very precise temperature in a water bath. This technique produces results that are impossible to achieve through any other cooking method.

Preparations: Pork belly in roasted garlic puree, bomba spice and chile de arbol. This is marinated overnight and then cooked sous vide until it is very, very tender. When finished we cut the pork into cubes and fry them to order. A mojo is made in a traditional way with cas fruit and poured into the bottom of a bowl. The fried pork belly is sprinkled with lime juice and topped with a salad of cabbage and chicharon, sprinkled with bomba spice.


Vuelve a la vida

Country: Venezuela, Mexico

Story: Originating in Venezuela and its coasts, natives of the region believe it offers aphrodisiac properties provided by the seafood included in its preparation. Mostly sold as street food in the form of pickles in a jar in Venezuela, it eventually made its way to Mexico and along the way became more of a ceviche. This version of the recipe is popular in many countries now and is the style of our version here at Alma.  

Preparation: Fresh Snapper is marinated in the tomato broth to flavor the fish. Then the fish and the tomato broth is put on the plate and garnished with Pepino, Aguacate, Chile Dulce, Culantro and jalapeno.

Atún Nikkei

Country: Peru

Story: In 1889, Japanese workers, invited over by the promise of jobs, came to Peru on work contracts. They helped to farm and build the country’s economy. Many workers decided to stay in Peru, forming families, integrating with society, and especially where food was concerned. Nikkei is a cuisine that’s often mislabeled as fusion but it runs much deeper than that. These people opened businesses with the aim of catering for Peruvians. They opened in their homes and no one did Japanese cuisine – there wasn’t a market for it, they had to cook Peruvian food but they started to add their own little touches, like taking dishes normally served with meat and changing the base of the dish to fish. Japanese chefs couldn’t get all the ingredients they needed so they had to use, and be creative, with Peruvian ingredients. Nikkei is a cuisine that has grown with the culture, slowly evolving with new steps along the way.

Preparation: Leche de tigre and Tamarindo reduction is mixed together to form a sauce and then set aside. Separately, a salad is mixed together with Chayote, Pepino, Rabano and Orange Vinaigrette. To plate the sauce mixture, salad mixture, fresh diced tuna and cebollino is mixed together and placed into a mold to make a shape. Once the mold is removed, tajin is sprinkled on fried rice paper and placed on top of the tuna tower as a garnish.

Tostada de Pulpo

Country: Mexico

Story: Sikil P’ak (Sikil = Pumpkin Seeds and P’ak = Tomato) is a puree that originates from the Yucatan Peninsula in Mexico. The recipe is ancient and simple to produce but the flavor is bold and complex. The process involves grinding roasted pumpkin seeds into a flour and using a molcajete to make a puree with charred onions and tomatoes, chili’s, cilantro, orange juice and sesame seeds.
Sous vide (pronounced sue-veed) is a cooking technique that utilizes precise temperature control to deliver consistent results. High-end restaurants have been using sous vide cooking for years to cook food to the exact level of doneness desired, every time. The technique is popular because of easy-to-use sous vide precision cooking equipment called a circulator. The circulator heats water to a specific temperature that you choose which is determined by what you are cooking. Sous vide, which means “under vacuum” in French, refers to the process of sealing food in a bag, then cooking it to a very precise temperature in a water bath. This technique produces results that are impossible to achieve through any other cooking method.

Preparation: Sikil P’ak puree is spread over a crispy corn tortilla in a thin layer. The Octopus is slow cooked for hours in sous vide until is is tender with olive oil, garlic and herbs. When finished, the Octopus is then grilled, cut into bite sized pieces and coated in the Ancho puree. A salad is mixed together of Palmito, Tomate cherry, Cebolla morada, Pina, Naranja and Culantro Coyte. The salad is placed on top of the crispy tortilla holding the Sikil P’ak puree and then finished with the octopus pieces.

Churros

Country: China —- > Spain and Portugal and eventually all of Latin America

Story: Invented in China, eventually Churros moved to Spain and Portugal, who brought the recipe to Latin America. Churros can either be thin and sometimes knotted, or long and thick, where they are known as porras in some regions. They are normally eaten for breakfast, dipped in champurrado, hot chocolate, dulce de leche or café con leche. Sugar is often sprinkled on top. Churros are fried until they become crunchy. The surface of a churro is ridged due to having been piped from a churrera, a syringe-like tool with a star-shaped nozzle.

Preparation: The churros are fried to order and then sprinkled with cinnamon sugar mixture. They are served with blackberry sauce, dulce de leche and chocolate sauce.


🔥Electric Animals Fest🔥

This is a festival full of national and international talent distributed in two stages that will make you dance all day long

💥LINEUP:
Brian Cid (Endangered, NYC)
Andre Gazolla (Proper House, BR)
Pilato (MIA)
Andre Silva (BR)
Oneiro
Burika
Javee
Fercho Salazar
Desostoa
Alex Orias
María Wabe
Brenda Segura
Wizard
Fernando Melo
Bunny Wabbit
Funka
Alux

Tickets for sale in Hugo App!

Barrio Amón

El restaurante Alma de Amón está ubicado en el agradable e histórico Barrio Amón. En esta zona histórica se encuentran edificios construidos a finales del siglo XIX y principios del XX. En los últimos años, muchos de los sitios históricos de la zona se han convertido en hoteles, restaurantes y oficinas. Este nuevo uso hace de la zona de Amón un paseo arquitectónico estimulante.

Si te encuentras en la zona podrás ver desde mansiones de concreto art deco hasta estructuras victorianas tropicales pintadas con colores brillantes en diversos estados de mantenimiento, es un centro único de San José.

No dejes pasar la oportunidad de conocer los sitios históricos de Barrio Amón y de paso visitarnos en Alma de Amón para disfrutar de un café con tus amigos.